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Perceive and change feelings in the body.

By 10. April 2019field report

Ich leite eine offene Woodstocking-Gruppe, an der jeder teilnehmen kann, der ein Interesse an Selbstbewusstsein und einem Woodstock hat. Recently we did an exercise on the topic: “Perceiving and changing feelings in the body”. We were 8 people, 3 new faces, some beginners and some old hands.

After my introductory words we have already started the warm-up part of the exercises. We really got into the swing of the Woodstock.

I had prepared some notes for each of which I had written a feeling, an emotion – sometimes positive, sometimes negative. I put the notes hidden in front of the participants. Everyone stood on it and felt inside themselves. It was interesting to hear who had perceived something and what was perceived. Here it was tingling, there someone was getting cold, here you felt the shoulder that hurt, one felt very calm, and so on.

Then we did the heart exercise, an exercise that opens the heart so that we can feel ourselves better.

Now it became exciting, because everyone put themselves on the piece of paper again, to notice whether there is a difference to before.

And indeed, there were differences! One participant felt really good now, but didn’t want to stay on the piece of paper anymore, because it now felt as if she was being pushed down. We turned the note over, and behold, the word below was “fearful”. It became clear that through the exercise she was no longer in resonance with fear, and therefore no longer wanted to vibrate with the energy field of the word under the note, but was now completely at ease and calm. For another participant it felt cold before the exercise and after the exercise she was comfortable all around. She said she felt well-balanced – and indeed, when you looked under the note, it said “well-balanced”.

Basically it is very exciting to be able to perceive your own feelings, to be able to classify them. Only when we become aware of what we really feel can we change something. We can ask ourselves: “Have I done this more often? Where did it come from? Am I? Is it perhaps an event that I had a long time ago, but which has nothing to do with me? In this way we become more conscious of ourselves and can only begin to break through the established emotional processes. For example, I could observe my fear and distance myself from it. Over time I could classify it so that it no longer burdened me fundamentally, but perhaps only drew my attention to something from time to time.

Use this paper game from time to time as a decision aid. Sometimes I can stand calmly like a flag swaying back and forth in the wind or fall down completely – depending on which decision proposal I have just written on the piece of paper.

Thank you dear ones, I look forward to the next meeting.

Sincerely

Ina

 

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